8 Things That Can Help You Get The Best Night of Sleep Possible

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If you’re tossing and turning all night, hitting the snooze button more than once, then loading up on coffee in the morning, you might be among the many Americans wishing for a better night’s sleep. Sleep issues have become a common problem in our modern society. Over 68% of Americans report that they have a bad night at least once a week and a quarter of them say that they experience poor sleep most nights. That’s a lot of missing sleep!

Maybe you’re wondering if you struggle with insomnia. How can you tell? The general definition of insomnia is that it’s an inability to fall asleep easily and/or stay asleep easily all night, even when you have a restful environment for sleep. The National Institute for Health reports that about 30% of Americans have symptoms associated with insomnia.

Everyone gets insomnia occasionally.

Sometimes before a big test or important interview, you might have trouble sleeping, and that’s pretty normal. But if you have issues sleeping on a regular basis, especially three or more nights per week, and if it’s been going on for months or even years, you probably have chronic insomnia.

When you don’t get enough sleep, the next day is usually pretty rough. You’ll typically feel drowsy, have trouble thinking clearly, have a hard time concentrating, and lack energy. You might even get irritable and angry easily, which doesn’t bode well for relationships with family, friends, and coworkers. Chronic insomnia can also lead to serious health issues such as obesity, diabetes, heart disease, anxiety, and depression.

So how do you get back to sleep and move to a healthy sleep cycle? Here are some of the best tips to help you slumber peacefully all night, every night.

Turn Off the TV and all Electronics an Hour Before Bed

The blue light coming from the screens of your television and devices suppresses the release of melatonin with is an important hormone for sleep. Keep your electronics out of your bedroom, if you can, and definitely make sure all electronic lights are out at night. Most people don’t realize that using electronics before bed can affect their sleep. Consider removing your phone from your room and not using it for your alarm. If you must keep your phone in your bedroom, be sure to turn it on “Airplane Mode” and turn off Wi-Fi.

Take Some Time to Relax Before Bed

Good choices for relaxing activities include meditating, reading a calming book, or listening to peaceful music. Make sure your pre-bedtime activities are relaxing and make you feel sleepy.

Exercise Every Day

It can help you sleep better at night, so make sure to include at least a brisk walk in your daily schedule. Just make sure you don’t exercise at night, as it can “amp” you up causing you to have a hard time settling down for sleep.

Take sleep promoting supplements and herbs. These include magnesium, melatonin, and valerian. Try them out to see if they’ll work for you and adjust the dose as necessary (always check with your holistic doctor first).

Create a Dark Bedroom

Your body takes cues from your environment, so your bedroom needs to be dark in order for your brain to believe that it’s time for sleep. Train your circadian rhythm again to get back to a healthy schedule by ensuring that your room is always dark. If you can’t make it pitch black, wear an eye mask to block out the remaining light.

Find out what’s causing you stress

This is especially important if you spend a lot of time thinking about your worries while trying to fall asleep or when you wake up in the middle of the night. Journal right before bed to get it all out on paper, leaving your mind free to relax for the night.

Reduce Your Caffeine Intake

Caffeine may be the cause of your insomnia, especially if you ingest it in the late afternoon or evening. Reduce your intake and keep it to a morning routine. Then you’ll give your body enough time to wind down in the evenings for rest.

Create a bedtime routine. The human brain and our circadian rhythms love routine. By creating a routine, you’ll signal to your brain that sleep is coming soon. Keep to the same bedtime hours, if possible. After a while, you’ll notice your body is immediately triggered by the routine and starts to feel sleepy.

Take a Warm Bath

Include it as part of your bedtime routine, adding in lavender essential oil to increase your sense of relaxation. Add in a little meditation and you’ll start to feel sleepy right away.

Sip a Cup of Relaxing, Warm Tea

If you love tea, stock up on some that are known to promote relaxation, such as chamomile. An hour or so before bed, brew yourself a cup and sit in a calm place to sip on it. Make sure it’s caffeine free though. It might be a great thing to do while journaling or taking a bath.

Get Help if You Need it

If you’ve tried all these things and you’re still struggling to get to sleep, reach out to a holistic doctor, practitioner, or wellness coach. They can help you find out what is causing your insomnia, such as an imbalance of cortisol, adrenal, or other hormones. They can then help you find the solution to get back in balance and get back to sleep.
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About the Author

Suzanne Monroe

Suzanne Monroe is the author of The Holistic Cookbook & Lifestyle Guide: 12 Weeks to a Healthier, Happier You, the co-author of 101 Ways to Improve Your Health, and is a health and business expert appearing regularly in the media. Suzanne was inspired to create the IAWP Wellness Coach Training & Certification Program in collaboration with other leading health experts in order to inspire people to create meaningful careers and spread the message of wellness.